NAB 2014: 6K ARRI ALEXA PREVIEW

1 Apr
ALEXA 6k Prototype

ALEXA 6k Prototy

Yes…everybody was waiting for it now it seems it will be something we will see later this year.

ARRI will show (or preview for that matter) a 6K ARRI ALEXA at NAB this year…. finally! (see there is a 6k tag on that ALEXA Prototype right there!!!)
Now, usually I don’t post about camera news and stuff but this one is a big one and as you might now I’m kinda a fan of the “original” ALEXA and the Image quality it’s delivering.

Now do i think the “old” ALEXA is not good enough anymore? No, it still is a pretty good Camera, especially for TV Production. But for the future of Cinema it might be a good step to upgrade “a bit” ;)

Now it seems you will get a pretty good “downrez” 6K to 2K ProRes “option” with this new one that might be a good upgrade for the TV world. But 4K is coming at some point if  you are like it or not.

So here are some of the specs that are known so far:

 

Sensor:
ARRI 65mm format ALEV IV Plus CMOS with Global Shutter
6144 x 3160 rez

Codecs:
ARRIRAW 6K
ProRes 4444 (only 2k?)

Frame Rates:
ARRIRAW 0.75 – 60 fps
ProRes 0.75 – 120 fps (2k)

Dynamic Range:
14+ Stops
Base EI 800, sensitivity settings from EI 200 to EI 6.400

more specs will be released at NAB.

 

UPDATE: look at the post date … yep it’s April 1st ;)

CONS SPACE 002 BLN … 1st clips

24 Jan

So a while back I was shooting for RED TOWER FILM a Documentary about a Converse Project called CONS SPACE 002 BLN.

It was located at a old abandoned factory in Berlin that was revived again by skaters and lots and lost of art. There is a full length Docu (70min or so) in the making and there well be a Teaser released soon.
For now there are two 1st clips online about Art and Music…. All shot on Canon C300, 60D, 7D and GoPro. Edit by a colleague and me in Premere Pro CC on OSX  on a Late2013 iMac and 2009 MacPro.

…more updates soon

Passion & Craft: Lucas Gilman – Adventure Photographer

24 Jan

A few weeks ago I had the chance to speak with Adventure Photographer Lucas Gilman in Berlin. He was there for a G-Technology event at the Apple Store in Berlin. We talked a bit about the passion and craft that goes in the work he does and about his work & “challenges” in the Video world.

Stay tuned for part two next month. He will talk more about his workflow and using the new MacPro since he had the chance to use it early ;)

Shot on Sony F3 using vintage Nikkor 35mm, 50mm and 85mm lenses and Canon 70D with Sigma 17-50mm f2.8

I actually used one tip I’ve got from Lucas for this Video … since it was kinda bad, grey and cold weather in Berlin everything kinda looked grey and cold but like Lucas said these are actually good conditions for Black and White shots. So his tip was: If the weather isn’t that great and all looks grey, make it black and white…and I think that worked out pretty nice ;)

So thanks for that tip, Lucas and for the time and thanks to the whole G-Tech crew in Berlin.

BTW I used a G-DRIVE ev via USB 3.0 on a 2009 MacPro with a CalDigit USB3.0 PCI-E card to manage the footage of the Sony F3 and 70D. I also used that drive for editing in Premiere Pro CC. It’s a solid little drive with transfer speeds like a big internal 3,5″ drive… pretty good!

some more info about Lucas Gilman:
g-technology.eu/g-team/lucas-gilman
nikonusa.com
apple.com/uk/aperture/action/gilman/

and his twitter-stream:
twitter.com/lucasgilman

EDITING 101: Reduce export time in Premiere Pro CC

14 Jan

So if you use like Magic Bullet Looks or any other “heavy & slow” plugins and want to reduce Export-times in Premiere Pro you should set your Sequence to ProResLT or any other good Master codec and work / edit with that Setting.

If you use like MagicBulletLooks and such you had to render while working anyways but you don’t have to re-render everything again with exporting. That happens usually if u don’t have “Use Preview” selected,

So to have this working properly you just select “Match Sequence” and “Use Preview” in the export settings and you are good to go.

Render-Times for this Sequence (GTX760):

with 1080p25 DSLR Seq. Preset = 16min 41sec
with 1080p25 PreResLT Seq. = 14min 42sec

Render-Times for this Sequence (GTX480):

with 1080p25 PreResLT Seq. = 14min 38sec

Render-Times for this Sequence (GTX480):

with 1080p25 PreResLT Seq. = 15min 35sec

Render-Times for this Sequence (GT640+GTX480):

with 1080p25 PreResLT Seq. = 19min 28sec
(it seems it uses the only the GT640 for openGL rendering)

—————————————————————————–


RENDER TIME WITH XFX Radeon HD 7970

(same 2009 MacPro, same sequence, same settings)

with 1080p25 PreResLT Seq. = 26min  37sec

(export time with Match Seq. + Use Preview was basically the same)
 

Rendertime with XFX Radeon HD 7970
in Windows 8.1, Premiere Pro CC, DNX 120 1080p Preset
32min 55sec

—————————————————————————

Export-Time for this Sequence (GTX760):

with 1080p25 DSLR Seq. Preset / no “Use Preview” = 15min 40sec
with 1080p25 PreResLT Seq. + Match Seq. + Use Preview = 01min 51sec

————————————————————————-

The Video-project in this “Tutorial” is actually a “real life” work project:

http://film-sound-color.prosite.com/124476/2094887/work/minidocu-city-leaks

BTW for your reference: I’m on a 2009 MacPro 4,1 with 2x4Cores, 24GB Ram, GTX760 4G GPU, OSX 10.9.1 on a SSD with Adobe Premiere Pro CC 7.2.1. Also have ny Render/Scratch disk on a 2nd SDD and also export to the other SDD.
Oh and here a link to on quick test export with a different project regarding that DNxHD gamma/REC709 issue:

ProRes Export (how it should look)

DNxHD Export (REC 709 gamma issue)

Music:
6th Sense – Both Nice
Robbero – Spheres

UPDATE II:

So i did a lil test (just for fun) to see if the HD7970 works better in FCPX, so i used 7toX to get the Project from PPro to FCPX
from PPro to FCXP

The Titels showed up as black video but thats ok I replaced that (did not expect to go through anyways) but other than that all good actually ….even though I “cleaned up” the Sequence a bit before … it was just like exporting as FinalCutPro XML opening that file in 7toX … importing that new XML in FCPX…. done! …now of course the MBL values und plugins do not show up but thats OK. One note on that: I had to update to FCPX 10.1.1. and re-installed MBL bcuz before FCPX 10.1 crashed a lot or even the MacPro went black and re-started … now in 10.1.1 all seems to work … render now and see what time i get in FCPX

So now the Rendertime:

FCPX Export-Time for this Sequence: 22min 20sec
(same 2009 MacPro with HD 7970, same sequence, same settings…only DenoiserII missing on the last clips)

your 3 favourite movies 2013?

30 Dec

So another year comes to an end…and a new one ist just about to start. Lots of exciting stuff happened … but even more awesome stuff will in 2014 ;-)

Now one questions I have for you guys is: what are your 3 favourite movies you’ve watched in 2013? 
It would be great if you let me know in the comments … maybe even tell why you liked the movie…

Thanks! …and have a great 2014! 

P.S. I might even try to publish a few more blogpost around here if I can ;)  

Canon 70D – ISO 12.800

23 Dec

So I’ve got a 70D the other day …. to upgrade / replace my 60D so to say.

Things change a bit on that cam. There is no movie mode on the mode-dial anymore its more like with the 7D … There is a movie/live view/photo switch on the right.

70D

70D

Anyway, I noticed that I can set / change the ISO range in the menu and even in Video mode I could set it to 12800 for maximum ISO.

70D

70D

70D

70D

But how good is it? … Is it useable? Well, i did some random test shots at a local Christmas market.

In the end it is by far no C300 or C100 by far and there is quite noticeable noise at ISO 3200 and more. But like others said before the noise is not as “awful” as with the 60D or 7D.

But then again, it’s no C300 organic looking noise. Depending on what you shoot and if there is enough light in the shot and especially with a wide open prime lens (like with in some shot in this case a 85mm at f2.0 or 2.8) you actually might be able to use some of the High ISO shots at 8000 or even 10.000, not every time tho’ and there will be some quite noticeable noise but I’ve seen worse.

At 12.800 it’s almost not really usable but you could get a shot you otherwise would miss. Almost all detail is gone tho’.

But again, I’ve seen worse or in the case of a 60D you would not be able to even think about those high settings at all. But see for yourself.

I did some quick basic “color grading” in Magic Bullet Looks and some basic noise reduction with DenoiserII…

You might be even able to “recover” / use more shots if you spend more time on Post so to say.

One more thing: In low light and with high ISO settings the Autofocus has a hard time since there is not much details left in the shot and the auto focus does not find a point to focus on it seems …most of the time.

One last thing: The 70D has a built-in stereo microphone on top or the viewfinder, it works nicely but it is picking up camera- and “user-noises” quite easily at times.

Over all it still is “only” a DSLR with Video mode but with nice autofocus options and a bit better ISO range.

[guest post]: Using Light leaks

3 Nov

What are light leak overlay effects, how to use them and why you’ll love them.

Light leaks are an essential effect for video editors to have in their editing arsenal. They can add warmth, texture, emotion and depth to footage, resulting in artistic videos that are unique and refreshing. To learn the what, why and how of light leaks, read on!

What are light leaks?

“Light leaks” began back in the analogue days of film, where film was generally shot on celluloid. In those days cameras had light-tight chambers that protected the camera’s film, however every now and again, a tiny gap or hole in the camera body would stream through the light-tight chamber and expose the camera film to extra light. This additional “leaked light” would then diffuse across the film, creating an interesting flare of light across the image.

Light leak effects for fcp and adobe

 
100 years ago this accidental “light leak” effect was the bane of every filmmaking professional – after all, it was considered a mistake and an accidental effect on the film. However over the years, new generations of film-makers have developed a polar shift in this mentality, and have actively sought to include the effect in their footage, both pre and post filming.

Why would you want your footage to look like a mistake?

Put simply, light leaks are no longer considered a mistake.  The artistic flare of light that light leaks create has been appreciated for what they really are; exciting and abundantly interesting looks that can turn an ordinary shot into something really special, adding a specific tone and feel to video projects.
They are also great for -
  • Transforming a dull shot into artistic footage.
  • Adding energy to footage through rapid and colourful light leak overlays.
  • Creating a cool vintage feel.
example of light leak lens effects

lady pouring drink with light leak video effects

How to achieve a light leak look – In camera or in post?

Though light leaks can still be created in camera (by exposing film to streams of light through the light-tight chamber), this process gives the film-maker limited control, and can cause damage to the camera and footage. More often, filmmakers will decide to apply the light leak effects in post as this gives them more control over when, where and how to place the light leaks.

When should I use light leak effects?

Light leaks in Wedding videos

Using light leaks in wedding videos can have an enormous effect on creating more romantic, soft and alluring footage.
For example, the wedding shot below was held in spring in an idyllic country wine estate. While the footage is beautiful, it is still a little ‘flat’, and there is opportunity make the shot stand out.

wedding light leak video effects for download

A way to do this could be to use light leaks to add extra warmth and color to the edit, such as adding a golden sunset tone to give the shot a more romantic feel. By adding warmth to the image without overpowering it, the shot has been transformed into a perfectly captured moment from your clients wedding day.

light leak lomo video effects, overlays and transitions for free download

Light leaks in Action Sports Videos

Sports is all about action – and overlaying colors and movement from light leaks can be the perfect accompaniment to your footage.
Imagine you are editing a new surfing video. The impressive shots of the surfers cutting “sick” on the waves, with loud music behind the footage could be great, but is there a way to make the shot a little more memorable?

Surfer carving a massive wave. Without light leaks.

In this scenario, you’ll need something a bit edgier than the soft light effects used previously in the wedding video. Instead you could consider using light leaks with with stronger reds and oranges (as appears when you come to the end of a reel of film stock).

surfing footage with light leak film burn effects

Light leaks in Music videos.

Music videos are entertainment, designed to take us away from our everyday life into bite-sized mental vacations where we experience the beat, the drums, the atmosphere of the music.
In saying that, if you’ve been hired by a band to edit their latest music video, you’ll need to ensure the video your editing does just that. Take the example below of a rock band. Their footage is in black and white, and though it kind of displays energy in the movement of the drummer, the shots kinda boring.

No light leak effects on music video footage.

What you need to do is add energy. Using light leaks with a series of streaking blue tinged light leaks and flares, you can make the video look much more interesting, vibrant and exciting.

 drummer with light leak effects being used on video footage

How do I use light leak effects.

As you can see, light leaks can transform footage that is dull to something extraordinary - all you need to do is decide what emotion or atmosphere you want to capture, and use light leaks as the tool to get you there. In this next part I’ll show you how easy it is to introduce them into your next edit.

Here’s a step by step break down how to use light leak effects in two of the more common editing platforms, Final Cut Pro X and Adobe Premiere Pro.
As a rule, any editing software that allows ‘composite’ or ‘blend’ modes to change will work with post production light leak effects.

Step 1 – Import your light leaks into your edit software.

For FCPX
Select FILE > IMPORT > MEDIA (keyboard shortcut = command + i) and choose the light leaks you want to import from the finder window.
Another way is to click on the import media button displayed below -
import footage into final cut pro x
For Premiere Pro
Select FILE > IMPORT (command + i for mac, ctl + i for PC) and select light leaks from popup window.
import footage into premiere pro cc

Step 2 – Choose the light leak you want to use!

So you’ve imported your light leaks? Now you just need to treat your recently imported light leaks like any other footage – scrub through the light leak until you find a moment in the light leak you specifically want to use. Make sure you set the in and out points around this moment.
set in and out points in final cut pro
Final Cut Pro X
set in and out points in adobe premiere pro
Adobe Premiere Pro

Step 3 – Positioning.

In your timeline position the chosen light leak above your footage.
overlay light leak footage in final cut pro
Final Cut Pro X
overlay footage in adobe premiere pro
Adobe Premiere Pro

Step 4 – Change the blend mode.

Change the light leaks “composite mode” to screen.
In FCPX

Make sure you have the light leak layer selected in your sequence.
Then open the inspector window by clicking this button on the far right of FCPX layout.

changing composite and blend modes in final cut pro

Now, in the inspector window under ‘Compositing’ change the ‘blend mode’ to Screen.
changing blend mode in final cut pro
change blend mode to screen fcpx

In Premiere Pro

Double click on the light leak in your timeline.
Click on the ‘Effect Controls’ tab in your source window.
adobe premiere pro blend modes

Now click the triangle next to Opacity.
changing blend modes in premiere pro

There you will see “blend mode”. Change it to screen. Screen mode will give you that classic light leak look.

light leak video effects before and after

 
And there you have it!
All it takes to add beautiful, colorful and energetic light leaks in your edit is 4 easy steps – and you’ve effectively transformed your footage from the ordinary to the extraordinary.

What’s next?

Experiment, experiment, experiment!
There are so many ways to manipulate light leaks to give you truly unique and individual looks. some of these are:
- Change Color.
If you’re purchased light leaks that have an orange tinge, you can simply use your editing softwares color corrector to change the colour from a warm orange to a cool blue and give a completely different look to your video.
 - Speed
If you want to add energy to a sport video, or adversely, a chilled, cool vibe to a wedding video, simply change the speed of the light leak. The faster the light leak flickers on your footage, the more energy it gives to your shot.
 - Flip/Flop
Want the light leak to sit in the left of frame, not right? Thats easy, just flop the shot!
 - Use multiple light leaks at once
The beauty of light leaks is that you can customise them to be a truly unique effect specific to your video. If a light leak is kind of working in your video, but something is still missing, consider using more than one light leak at once by simply stack them on different layers.
 - Use other blend modes apart from “Screen”
The Screen blend mode gives you that classic light leak look effect, but some of the other modes can add a whole new dimension to your footage!

different blend modes being used with light leaks

Getting Started with light leaks.

First step – finding light leaks to use in your footage!
A few experienced video editors actually create their own light leaks, however this can be a lengthy process if you are just getting started in the video editing world.

At LightLeakLove.com we have a free sample light leak collection for users to experiment with! It’s available for you to download and use as much as you want, so you can experience how light leaks can improve your next video project. The free sample light leak collection features light leaks from LightLeakLove’s three most popular collections, so you can get a taste of what type of light leaks you’d like to use in your next vid! Download your free light leak collection here.

If you have any questions on how to use light leaks, or just want to chat about how/when is best to use them, just email us at hello@lightleaklove.com. We’d love to hear from you!

Also a really big thanks for Michael for letting us contribute this tutorial on how to use light leaks.

Light it up!
Charlie @ LightLeakLove.com

t.c. electronic desktop konnekt 6

29 Jul

 

a quick review of a nice little firewire audio interface and stereo monitor control the t.c. electronic desktop konnekt 6. really good for what is does for the money. i really like the audio quality of the mic input, headphone, monitor outputs and audio interface itself. its well made for the price-range. the audio level meter is a nice feature and is reasonable good. over all a good piece of gear for audio and video editors, even for podcasters I’d might say. So my setup for recording tutorials and stuff like that is the Rode NTG1 connected the the desktop konnekt 6 and its good and clean sounding 48V phantom powered mic (pre-amp) input.

one think about the firewire connection … yes its is Firewire 400 (which is common for a audio interface …. or at least was) now, I know firewire ports are kinda a rare thing on computers these days… but i have to say in compassion to USB its a much more solid connection and i don’t mean that in terms of hardware itself, just the data stream is better. with USB its more likely that you run in to odd issues like odd background noises and stuff (since USB was initially invented to connect hardware like a keyboard or a computer mouse) …. so keep that in mind

more info about the unit:

http://www.tcelectronic.com/desktop-konnekt-6/

Mic I used:

http://www.rodemic.com/mics/ntg-1

Mic Pre Amp on the DSLR:

http://www.ikmultimedia.com/products/irigpre/

episode I recorded with the t.c. electronic desktop konnekt 6 and the Rode NTG1:

Music by 6th Sense, Broke For Free, Anitek

shot with Canon 60D with a TAMRON 17-50mm f2.8 XR Di II VC

Blog:

http://film-sound-color.tumblr.com

Video

Audio Basics for Podcasts – PART 3: Basic editing

18 Jun

So now this is the (for now final) part 3:

I just want to show you some basic ideas in terms of audio editing. This its just a quick overview, you might have your own style and way to do things. Also your application might have different Tools. But this is just a “reminder” so to say of what might be essential to get good edits. Now, i’m usually a bit better, faster & more precise at this kind of editing but i really just wanted you to show some “hints” so you can start to get stuff done or might think about your workflow and stuff.

If you have any question, let me know … I’ll make sure to get back to you or even make another tutorial to answer your question.
Also here is the Link to the Blogpost from Vashi Nedomansky about 5 Audio EQ Tips for Filmmakers:

http://vashivisuals.com/5-eq-audio-for-video-tips-for-filmmakers/

Video

Audio Basics for Podcasts – PART 2: Plug-Ins and Settings

17 Jun

So now we are talking ….

Its part two and i talk a lil bit about what basic plugin you kinda have to use and what settings you might have to pay attentional to to get a podcast to sound nice or right for that matter.

I talk about basic EQ settings and essential frequencies and Compressor settings and essential hints for getting settings right. Keep in mind I used only the plugins that come with Audition so you kinda can follow a lil better but I usually use other 3rd party plugins (I show some of those as well) so in the end it might not sound as good as it might with the plug-ins i know. I just want you show the basic idea … you always have to make your own experiences and should bring your own taste and workflow into it (after a while). All that is just a start for you. Use your ears. In the end it “just” has to sound & feel right. ;)

Part 3 will be up soon … I will talk and show a lil bit of basic things in terms of audio editing and what is essential there. So stay tuned!

Also here is the Link to the Blogpost from Vashi Nedomansky about 5 Audio EQ Tips for Filmmakers:
http://vashivisuals.com/5-eq-audio-for-video-tips-for-filmmakers/

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